Tag Archives: DJ Nappa

New Joint – Life MC & DJ Nappa / Krash Slaughta

Life MC & DJ Nappa ft. Krash Slaughta – “So Old School” (LifeMC.BandCamp.Com / 2022)

Life MC namechecks Grandmaster Flash, Mike Allen, Scott La Rock and more on this entertaining Nappa-produced trip down memory lane with cuts from Krash Slaughta.

New Joint – Life MC & DJ Nappa

Life MC & DJ Nappa – “Who Are You?” (LifeMC.BandCamp.Com / 2022)

UK favourites Life and Nappa drop the latest release in their monthly single series and ask us all to take a look at ourselves in the mirror.

100 Favourite Albums & EPs Of 2021 (Part Three) – Evidence / Children Of Zeus / Arrested Development etc.

Check Part One and Part Two.

Ca$ablanca x The Mali Empire – “Xtreme Xcellence” (Casablanca92fs.BandCamp.Com) – Dallas, Texas-based emcee Ca$ablanca has been dropping gems for a number of years now, but this Mali Empire-produced album may just have been his finest moment yet. Featuring the likes of Ray Vendetta, YNX716 and Nowaah The Flood, “Xtreme Xcellence” was packed with hard-hitting, precise lyricism delivered over a sublime selection of sample-driven tracks.

AZ – “Doe Or Die II” (QuietMoneyDirect.Com) – The idea of the ‘sequel album’ has become something of a cliché amongst golden-era rap artists. Some have seen the light of day. Some have remained unexecuted concepts destined only to be repeatedly mentioned during interviews. Some have succeeded. Some have failed. Thankfully, Brooklyn’s ever-consistent AZ managed to live up to the hype surrounding this follow-up to his 1995 debut, matching his slick, street-savvy verses with an experienced perspective and smoothed-out production from the likes of Bink!, Baby Paul and Pete Rock.

Milano x Showbiz – “Eating But Still Hungry” (MilanoxShowbiz.BandCamp.Com) – Any release coming from the Diggin’ In The Crates camp brings with it a high level of expectation from fans. Understandably, there’s a certain level of quality expected from members of the crew who really did it for the culture and became one of the most dominant forces in East Coast Hip-Hop. Milano and Showbiz rose to that challenge in no uncertain terms on this album packed with swaggering Rotten Apple attitude, skills sharpened in unforgiving street-corner ciphers and dope, dusty-fingered beats.

Kev Brown & J Scienide – “Stray From The Pack” (KevBrown.BandCamp.Com) – Following up their impressive 2019 collaboration “Drum Machine Tape Cassette”, DMV duo Kev Brown and J Scienide offered up another collection of loose, spontaneous sounding beats and rhymes inspired by both a love of the art and the satisfaction of making the competition feel inadequate. B-boy basement flavour.

The Primeridian & Rashid Hadee – “Prime Diesel” (RashidHadee.BandCamp.Com) – A product of Chicago’s rich underground scene, this collaboration between veteran duo The Primeridian and fellow Windy City representative Rashid Hadee was a shining example of top-tier beat science and carefully crafted lyricism. With additional production from Tall Black Guy and featured artists such as Thaione Davis, Pugs Atomz and Philmore Greene, this album captured a lot of talent at their very best.

Flashius Clayton x Jster – “The Dust Diary” (25NoteDope.BandCamp.Com) – A naturally gifted emcee, Cali’s Flashius Clayton was firing on all cylinders here, with his usual high-standard of lyrical expertise accompanied by the dark, hypnotic beats of West Coast producer Jster. An atmospheric dose of rough, rugged and raw Hip-Hop. As Doug E. Fresh once said, play this only at night.

Khrysis – “The Hour Of Khrysis” (JamlaRecords.Com) – Featuring a diverse selection of artists, from golden-era greats De La Soul and Hiero legend Del Tha Funkee Homosapien, to Compton’s Problem and Jamla Records own Reuben Vincent, this long-awaited album from Away Team / Soul Council producer Khrysis was firmly held together by the North Carolina music man’s sonic creativity. Drawing the most out of his list of collaborators thanks to the masterful, carefully constructed soundscapes on offer, Khrysis succeeded in stamping his own personality all over this release, complimenting the variety of emcees and vocalists included here rather than being overshadowed by them.

Vic Spencer – “Legend Laws Of Power” (SupaSounds.BandCamp.Com) – The last few years has been a relentless period of productivity for Chicago’s Vic Spencer, with the talented emcee dropping four albums in 2021 alone. “Legend Laws Of Power” found Spencer teaming-up with Chi-town producer Original Super Legend, delivering his barbed punchlines over strong beats, making it abundantly clear how unimpressed he’s been with the so-called opposition.

Nas – “King’s Disease II” (MassAppeal.Com) – Aside from a few tracks, I wasn’t a big fan of the first “King’s Disease” album. I just didn’t connect with it. This follow-up, however, prompted a totally different reaction. Aside from a couple of misplaced tracks I felt this was an inspired piece of work, with Nas and Hit-Boy really hitting their stride as a creative partnership. The Queensbridge legend sounded relaxed and focused here, embracing his elder statesman status and reminiscing on the experiences that shaped him, whilst still clearly looking towards the future.

L-Biz & Castle Money Beats – “The Cool Table LP” (IStayBizzy.Com) – Backed by the solid, melodic production of California’s Castle Money Beats, Buffalo, NY’s L-Biz encouraged artists and listeners alike not to conform and follow trends in order to have a place at “the cool table”, but instead walk your own path and carve out your own niche as an individual. Head-nodding Hip-Hop that was guaranteed to have a positive impact on your confidence levels and self-esteem.

Arrested Development – “For The FKN Love” (OfficialArrestedDevelopment.BandCamp.Com) – Powerful. Uplifting. Needed. Just a few of the words that could be used to describe this epic album from the longstanding Arrested Development crew. Largely produced by the UK’s Configa, who matched Speech’s motivational verses with some rousing work behind the boards, this was ultimately a positive album with a realistic outlook that was further enhanced by appearances from the likes of Masta Ace, Freddie Foxxx and Big Daddy Kane. Music to feed your Hip-Hop soul in today’s unsettled times.

DJ Nappa – “Redress” (DJNappa.BandCamp.Com) – A veteran of the UK Hip-Hop scene, Phi-Life Cypher’s Nappa dropped a stellar instrumental release for the We Stay True label which found the Luton-based producer upping the creative ante and moving in potentially unexpected directions, whilst remaining clear about his artistic vision at all-times. Steering away from typical boom-bap territory, “Redress” encapsulated a variety of styles, whilst capturing Nappa’s genuine passion for the art of making music.

Evidence – “Unlearning Vol. 1” (MisterEvidence.BandCamp.Com) – As a fan, the growth and evolution shown by West Coast emcee-slash-producer Evidence over the years has been a joy to behold (and hear). From his keep-it-underground approach in the 90s as a member of Dilated Peoples, to the more personal content of his solo albums, through to his instrumental work, Evidence has consistently moved forward whilst remaining rooted in his Hip-Hop foundations. “Unlearning Vol. 1” represented yet another important step in the right direction, with Evidence dropping timely lyrical gems over carefully selected production from the likes of The Alchemist, Nottz and Daringer.

Children Of Zeus – “Balance” (ChildrenOfZeus.BandCamp.Com) – To describe this sophomore album from Manchester’s Children Of Zeus as being a masterpiece would definitely be no overstatement. Having already appeared to have perfected their blend of soul and Hip-Hop on previous releases, Konny Kon and Tyler Daley refined their sonic aesthetic even further on “Balance”, reaching higher heights of creative perfection that transcended typical categorization. This was spiritual music that existed in its own unique time and place.

Awon & Phoniks – “Nothing Less” (AwonAndPhoniks.Com) – A partnership whose chemistry clearly points to them being destined to make music together, Virginia / Maine duo Awon & Phoniks came correct once again on their fourth long-player, effortlessly bringing together personal, socially-aware rhymes and strong production packed with sublime soul and jazz samples.

Guilty Simpson & Gensu Dean – “EGO” (MelloMusicGroup.BandCamp.Com) – Detroit’s Guilty Simpson has built a career on straight-no-chaser verses full of been-there-done-that life observations and cautionary street knowledge. Simpson offered more of the same on this collaboration with esteemed producer Gensu Dean, who provided the Motor City emcee with a raw, stripped-down collection of beats over which to reassert his position in the rap game.

Confucius MC – “Somewhere” (YNRProductions.BandCamp.Com) – London’s Confucius MC really took listeners on a lyrical journey throughout this album. Where was the destination? Well, that was largely down to your interpretation of the cerebral rhymes on offer here, which contained splashes of nostalgia, present day commentary and depictions of an uncertain future. The jazz-influenced production of France’s Keor Meteor fully complimented the UK emcee’s musings, with appearances from the likes of Jehst, Sonnyjim and Verbz adding to the overall feel of the album.

El Da Sensei & Jake Palumbo – “Solving Cases” (SpaceLABRecordings.BandCamp.Com) – Buoyed by a real sense of momentum and energy, this collaboration between Artifacts legend El Da Sensei and NY’s Jake Palumbo was full of upbeat joints powered by punchy, drum-heavy production and true-school lyricism. With appearances from Sadat X, John Robinson and Shabaam Sahdeeq, this album had the feel of a lively cipher session at times, with everyone involved clearly on a mission to celebrate Hip-Hop.

Ambassador Rick – “The Tape Nobody Made” (TheOpioidEra.BandCamp.Com) – One-third of Virginia’s Opioid Era crew, Ambassador Rick continued the group’s tradition of crafting uncompromising, emotionally-charged street music on this solo release. Bridging the gap between raw and righteous, Rick combined verbal grit with moments of genuine reflection, all delivered over vintage soul samples and smooth loops.

Snaggapuss & Ramzee – “Bronx Dundee” (RapRecordsAU.BandCamp.Com) – Veteran NY emcee Snaggapuss joined forces with Australian producer Ramzee for this hardcore-yet-entertaining album, with the former member of Doo Wop’s Bounce Squad utilising his inimitable flow to deliver punchline-heavy rhymes laced with humour over satisfyingly sparse, stripped-down beats.

Part Four coming soon.

Album Review – DJ Nappa

DJ Nappa

“Redress”

(WeStayTrue.BandCamp.Com)

DJ Nappa is a name that really should need no introduction. A veteran of the UK Hip-Hop scene, the Luton-based producer first caught the attention of many heads back in the late 90s as the sonic backbone of the mighty Phi-Life Cypher crew, with the group’s debut “Baddest Man EP” release quickly becoming a cult classic, due in part to Nappa’s accomplished, sample-based beats. Just from hearing that initial PLC white label back in 1998 stood at the counter of London’s Deal Real Records (and promptly buying a copy), it was clear to my ears (and to those jostling for room at the same counter) that the tracks thundering from the shop’s speakers had been made by someone who obviously took their craft seriously.

Fast-forward over twenty years later and Nappa’s impressive discography shows exactly how serious he’s remained about his music, with a number of critically-acclaimed Phi-Life Cypher projects under his belt, plus work with the likes of MCM, Inja, Cappo and many more.

The talented crate-digger previously dabbled in the realm of instrumental Hip-Hop back in 2014, releasing two volumes of his “Late Night Beat Tape” cassettes, but his first release for the We Stay True label finds Nappa really upping the creative ante, moving in potentially unexpected directions yet remaining on-point and clear about his artistic vision at all times.

Nappa could quite easily have taken the predictable approach to this project and put together a collection of typical boom-bap beats, all of which, I’m sure, would have been made to a very high standard. But that would have been the easy option. Listening to “Redress” you definitely get the feeling that Nappa wanted to take full advantage of this opportunity, to both challenge himself and also to offer a nod of respect to many of his influences.

The album’s opening track “The Fear” is an immediate attention-grabber, with the ominous combination of rattling drums and threatening synths hinting at what 80s TV show “The Equalizer” may have sounded like had Nappa been asked to provide a musical score for it in a different lifetime.

Any tension that may have been created by that first cut is gently blown away by the soothing pianos, echoing horns and deft scratches of “Speak”, a track that succeeds in its mission to showcase music as not only a means of communication, but also as something that can have a positive impact on our personal well-being. Good vibrations, indeed.

The aptly-titled “Make It Funky” is a loose and lively tribute to the iconic James Brown, whilst the KRS-One-sampling “Get What I’m Saying” is also drenched in old-school vibes, with the blend of slick, repetitive guitar licks and soulful vocal snippets possessing a hypnotic quality which is both relaxing and simultaneously slightly unsettling (in the best possible way).

Arguably my favourite track on the album, the retro drum-machine thump and syncopated handclaps of “Friday Late Night” immediately took me back to being a youngster in the mid-80s tuning in over the weekend to the late, great Mike Allen on London’s Capital Radio and hearing the latest fresh sounds from the likes of Just-Ice, MC Chill and DJ Cheese. So I couldn’t help but smile when right at the very end of this blast of b-boy-influenced nostalgia the warm, inimitable voice of Mr. Allen himself can be heard for a few brief seconds lifted straight from one of his many classic shows. Brilliant.

The melodic head-nodder “Relax Your Mind” ends the album on a mellow note, demonstrating Nappa’s knack for knowing how to let a track breathe, whilst also ensuring there’s enough happening to keep the listener locked on and in the zone.

An album that encapsulates a variety of sounds and styles yet remains cohesive and concise throughout, “Redress” is a body of work Nappa should be proud of, which not only highlights his undeniable technical abilities, but also captures his genuine passion for the art of making music.

Give the man behind the beats some credit.

Ryan Proctor

“Redress” is available here via We Stay True.

New Joint – Life MC & DJ Nappa

Life MC & DJ Nappa – “Ghost Rider” (@LifeMC / @Nappa72 / 2020)

Punchline-heavy speaker-rattler from the two Phi Life Cypher legends – if you grew-up as an 80s kid in the UK make sure you let this play right until the end for a heavy dose of childhood nostalgia.

100 Best Albums & EPs Of 2017 (Part Five) – Ray Vendetta & Giallo Point / Defari / Conway etc.

Check Part One, Part Two, Part Three & Part Four.

Ray Vendetta & Giallo Point – “Sins Of The Son” (PrestigiousRecordings1.BandCamp.Com) – Triple Darkness member Vendetta called on the talents of prolific producer Giallo Point for this epic display of hardcore brilliance, with the London-based lyricist dropping vivid, street-smart rhymes over expertly-crafted loops and beats perfectly suited to the UK emcee’s forthright delivery.

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Showbiz & A.G. – “Take It Back” (DITCEnt.Com) – One of Hip-Hop’s greatest musical partnerships, Bronx duo Show & A.G. dropped this stellar effort some twenty-five years after their first releases appeared on record store shelves. Having lost none of his dusty-fingered touch, Showbiz delivered plenty of that trademark DITC sound here, with Andre The Giant flowing effortlessly throughout.

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Jazz Spastiks & Mellosoulblack – “Midnight Method” (JazzSpastiks.BandCamp.Com) – UK production duo the Jazz Spastiks provided Stateside crew Mellosoulblack with a heavy dose of their full-bodied production sound on this quality collaborative album. Thumping beats, random samples and crafty cuts were blended with witty, freestyle-flavoured rhymes here, resulting in an upbeat, feel-good true-school listening experience.

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Rapsody – “Laila’s Wisdom” (Jamla Records / Roc Nation) – 2017 was a big year for North Carolina’s Rapsody, culminating in a Grammy nomination for this deserving body of work. Truth be told, the talented artist didn’t do anything different here than she’s already been doing since debuting her solo material in 2011, incorporating personal experiences, fierce lyricism and a good ear for strong production into one undeniable package. The increased amount of attention Rapsody received this time around, however, was proof that talent and hard-work can get you to where you want to be.

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Kamanchi Sly – “Slycriminality” / “Ultimate BBoy 92” (KamanchiSly.Com) – Hijack legend K Sly dropped two albums in 2017 and, as much as I tried, I really couldn’t decide which was the better of the two, so I’m giving props to both projects here. A pioneer of the 80s UK Hip-Hop scene, the South London lyricist proved throughout both these self-produced releases that his dedication to microphone dominance hasn’t faded over the years at all. Mixing a true love of Hip-Hop culture with a passion for crushing the competition and some wordly wisdom, Kamanchi Sly injected his 2017 output with the energy of a new artist and the experience of a battle-hardened veteran. Stockwell serves again!

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Estee Nack & Friends – “#MiniMansionDust Vol.2” (EsteeNack.BandCamp.Com) – Tragic Allies member Estee Nack dropped science alongside Daniel Son, al.divino and Mr. Rose on this solid collection of fly underground jewels, with the Massachusetts mic fiend’s gritty delivery and righteous street knowledge hitting the target as always.

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Flashius Clayton & Lisaan’dro – “Money Makin Music” (FlashiusClayton.BandCamp.Com) – The end result of a weekly series of free tracks dropped between September and November, this project effectively showcased the sharp rhyme skills of Cali’s Flashius Clayton and NY’s Lisaan’dro, two distinctly different emcees with a shared passion for the craft of lyricism. Featuring production from Farma Beats, The Historian and Spectacular Diagnostics, “Money Makin Music” marked both these talented individuals as ones to watch in 2018 and beyond.

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Blacastan & Stu Bangas – “The Uncanny Adventures Of Watson & Holmes” (BrickRecords.Com) – The sequel to their 2014 Watson & Holmes project, this album was another collection of raw beats and rhymes from the Connecticut emcee and Boston producer that definitely wasn’t for the faint-hearted. Slashing through your speakers with razor-sharp precision, the chemistry shared between the pair was apparent once again here, with all the elements of a true musical partnership on display.

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Jay-Z – “4:44” (RocNation.Com) – Jay-Z has always been a divisive figure in Hip-Hop, sparking passionate debates between those who see him as a calculating commercial rapper and others who consider him one of the greatest artists of all-time. To be fair, both camps have valid points, as Hov’s career has contained moments of sonic brilliance and disappointment. This album, however, was his best release in a decade, with the nearly fifty-year-old artist talking about topics a nearly fifty-year-old artist in Jay’s position should be addressing in their music – family, society, personal failures, successes – displaying a different side to the Brooklyn icon than we’d heard and seen before.

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Ankhlejohn – “The Red Room” (Shaap Records / FxckRxp.Com) – The raspy-voiced Washington D.C. wordsmith dropped this cohesive collection of late-night street-hop mixing East Coast boom-bap sensibilities with a no-holds-barred lyrical approach, resulting in a project that was something of an acquired taste but that offered a unique listening experience for those who embraced “The Red Room” in all of its unhinged glory.

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Spnda & Grubby Pawz – “Steel Sharpens Steel” (CityYardMusic.BandCamp.Com) – On point like a knife blade, this Boston duo’s album was an effective lesson in how to craft a project that has the ability to really draw the listener in, with Spnda’s liquid swordplay meshing perfectly with producer Pawz’ loop-based mellow madness, resulting in an album that was both atmospheric and captivating with maximum replay value.

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RSXGLD – “RSXGLD” (RSXGLD.BandCamp.Com) – This album found veteran Michigan representatives RoSpit and 14KT successfully pushing their respective creative boundaries on each track, giving “RSXGLD” a sound that was soulful, hardcore and experimental in equal measures. Ambitious, personal, speaker-rattling Hip-Hop.

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Jehst – “Billy Green Is Dead” (YNRProductions.BandCamp.Com) – Named after a socially-aware 1972 Gil-Scott Heron track, UK producer-on-the-mic Jehst’s first album in six years was a deep musical experience to fully immerse yourself in, offering commentary on today’s modern world which, at times, made for unsettling and haunting listening. A truly brilliant work of art.

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Recognize Ali & Giallo Point – “Back 2 Mecca” (RecognizeAli.BandCamp.Com) – The last of three albums to be released in 2017 by Greenfield Music’s talented Recognize Ali, this project paid tribute to the culture of Hip-Hop and was powered by the typically impressive production of the UK’s Giallo Point, with the likes of Estee Nack, Daniel Son and PhybaOptikz also contributing their skills to this raw collection of subterranean gems.

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Life MC & DJ Nappa – “Audio Bliss” (LifeMC.BandCamp.Com) – One of UK Hip-Hop’s most distinctive voices, Life MC touched on a variety of topics throughout this succinct seven-track EP, with fellow Phi-Life Cypher member Nappa pulling out some top-drawer production to match the Luton lyricist’s passionate verses.

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Ash The Author & Krang – “Two Man Band” (BoomBapPro.Com) – Lively, spontaneous vibes from the UK duo, with Ash’s cleverly cocky rhymes sitting nicely over the jazz-influenced production of Krang, a combination which added another worthy release to the Boom Bap Professionals label catalogue.

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Defari – “Rare Poise” (Fat Beats) – Part of the mid-90s West Coast independent scene and a Likwit Crew affiliate, Defari is no stranger to releasing quality music. Calling on the production skills of Evidence to assist in crafting his first album in eleven years, the Cali emcee proved that he hadn’t missed a beat with this self-assured set which also featured appearances from longstanding Left Coast wordsmiths Rakaa Iriscience, Krondon and Phil Tha Agony.

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Verb T & Pitch 92 – “Good Evening” (HighFocus.BandCamp.Com) – Supported by the brilliant production of Mouse Outfit music man Pitch 92, the mighty Verb T dropped an engaging, down-to-earth mix of life observations, dry wit and personal reflection, proving once again why his stature as UK Hip-Hop royalty is so well-deserved.

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Codenine – “IX” (Codenine.BandCamp.Com) – Backed by the sublime, minimalist soundscapes of producers Kas and Motif Alumni, Tragic Allies member Codenine made sure that not a moment of his time on the mic was wasted here, packing his verses with vivid imagery and a near-cinematic attention to detail that put him head-and-shoulders above much of his competition.

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Conway – “G.O.A.T.” (WhoIsConway.Com) – Buffalo’s master of murderous mood music returned at the end of the year with a fresh batch of  cold-hearted crime rhymes and dark Daringer production, closing off what had been an eventful twelve months for the Griselda emcee and setting high expectations for what 2018 may bring via Conway’s signing to Eminem’s Shady Records.

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Late Night Beat Tape 2 Stream – Nappa And Justice

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Following-up his dope “Late Night Beat Tape” project released earlier this year, skilled UK-based producer Nappa has joined forces with Muj label head-honcho Justice this time around to deliver another quality selection of beats, breaks and random soundbites – a true journey into sound.

Old To The New Q&A – DJ Nappa

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Developing his passion for Hip-Hop in the early-80s, the UK’s DJ Nappa made his name outside of his Luton stomping grounds a decade later, providing the production which would help his crew Phi-Life Cypher grab the attention of heads in Britain and beyond when the group first began releasing wax in the late-90s.

Producing the majority of Phi-Life’s classic 2000 Jazz Fudge album “Millennium Metaphors”, Nappa has spent  subsequent years keeping his raw brand of drum-heavy, sample-flavoured beats largely in-house, ensuring the second Cypher album, 2003’s “Higher Forces, was a worthy follow-up to its predecessor, whilst also working on the occasional outside project in-between providing long-time friend Life  with strong sounds for his slew of solo albums.

With Phi-Life Cypher announcing their split at the end of 2012, Nappa has remained busy, still digging in the crates, still crafting guaranteed head-nodders and still remaining faithful to the true-school sonic ethics he entered the UK scene with all those years ago as an upcoming producer.

Having just released his instrumental “Late Night Beat Tape” project, a wide-ranging selection of obscure samples, top-shelf breaks and random soundbites, Nappa recently stepped away from his equipment long enough to discuss his early production efforts,  the never-ending search for the perfect beat and his creative process.

Sample this!

At what point did you decide that you wanted to be a producer?

“I had turntables and was already deejay-ing and collecting breaks and stuff. But it wasn’t until I heard Caveman’s “Positive Reaction” album for the first time  in the early-90s that I really thought about producing. The production on that album blew me away. It wasn’t the typical UK sound of the time and the album really struck a chord with me. After I heard that, I started putting bits and pieces together on a four-track. I had an Amiga with this tiny little silver box that sat on top of it which was the sampler. So you could play fours things at a time basically, but no more than that. So I started making little loops on there for awhile. At the time, there was another Hip-Hop deejay in Luton, a mate of mine called Johnny The Fox, and he used to be on pirate radio. He started a rave / dance type label called Furious Records and I put my first piece of vinyl out on there. It was a bit s**t though to be honest (laughs).”

Were you recording under a different name then?

“I called myself The Creator and there was one track on the single called “Time To Get Wrecked”, where I used a Pete Rock sample from “The Creator”, and another one was called “Scat” where I just had some drums and put this little jazzy scat sample over the top. It was terrible (laughs). I think I do still own a copy somewhere and I’m sure you can get it on Discogs for 50p or something (laughs). But that was my first venture onto vinyl in 1992.”

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So prior to you actually getting into production you were listening to breaks but not with the intention of doing anything with them musically?

“Yeah, exactly. It was all about the “Ultimate Breaks & Beats” albums. I think the first one I actually bought was Volume 12 with “Funky Drummer” on it plus “The Champ” and “Ashley’s Roachclip”. There was a guy I went to school with, Steve, it was his birthday one year, this would have been 1986, and he went down to Bluebird Records in Luton, which later became Soul Sense, and he brought a load of the “Ultimate Breaks & Beats” albums. I remember we went back to his house to listen to them and that was the first time I heard  The JB’s “Blow Your Head”. I was just like, ‘Wow! This is crazy!’ But at that point I definitely wasn’t thinking of making beats myself, I was just cutting the breaks up on the turntables. But like I said, it wasn’t until I heard Caveman that I really started to think about doing production myself.”

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I always credit Caveman as being a really pivotal group within the British scene and, for me, “Positive Reaction” helped usher in a new era of production in UK Hip-Hop that stepped away from the traditional Brit-core sound and started to delve into funkier, jazzier samples…

“It was all about the sample material that they were using on that album. I mean, before that time, a lot of the samples you were hearing being used, you already knew what they were because they’d been used before. But when I heard “Positive Reaction”, the beats that The Principal was putting together on there just made me say, ‘Wow! What is this?’ I can still remember hearing the “Victory” single for the first time om Tim Westwood’s Capital Radio show back in 1990. At the time, I had a Sunday night pirate show on Pressure FM in Luton. Now, this was when MCM was on Westwood’s show all the time and he was doing a lot of gigs around the UK with Westwood and I remember they went to Batchwood Hall in St. Albans. I went down there and kinda just threw myself at MCM like, ‘You’re the s**t! You’re the best! What are those samples you’re using?’ He was a bit like, ‘Okay, chill out, chill out’ (laughs). But MCM was cool and he ended up playing me some of the “Positive Reaction” album in Westwood’s jeep and then gave me the tape! I was just like, ‘Wooow!’ This was before it had actually come out so I was dropping that all over the place (laughs). But me and MCM swapped numbers and we started chatting on the phone and we’re still friends to this day. But he taught me a lot about music back then. For example, Kool & The Gang, back then as far as I was concerned they were some disco pop s**t, but MCM put me onto the proper Kool & The Gang s**t. There was a track on “Positive Reaction” called “You Can’t Take It” which used Kool & The Gang’s “Who’s Gonna Take The Weight” and MCM told me about that. Then I went and found the record and it just opened me up to this whole other musical universe that was out there beyond the breaks that we’d already heard people using.”

That was the beautiful thing about Hip-Hop back then, that as a fan you took an active interest in the records that were being sampled and would want to learn more about a Roy Ayers or a James Brown. That whole process really helped you join the dots between the music of the time and the music of the past…

“Yeah, there isn’t so much of that happening anymore. But back then, that was a real eye-opener for me because before that I had really just been listening to the  original breaks and I definitely wasn’t digging into jazz or anything like that. I mean, during that late-80s era a lot of the samples that were being used on Hip-Hop records were being sampled straight off the “Ultimate Breaks & Beats” albums. But when people started using the jazz samples, that opened up a whole new music world to me.”

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So how did things progress for you from working with that original Amiga computer set-up to coming out with Phi-Life Cypher in the late-90s?

“So, like I said, it was around 1990 when I first started getting into the production side of things, and for the next few years I was really just messing around on the Amiga. I was making loops up and then I’d play them to MCM when I’d go and check him in High Wycombe and he’d be like, ‘Yeah, they’re alright.’ He wouldn’t tell me they were s**t, but he was just being really cool about it (laughs). Now, at the time, MCM had an Akai S950 and he taught me how to use it. He even let me me borrow it a few times and bring it back to Luton. So that’s how I really learnt to make proper beats, with MCM teaching me how to work the S950 and how to sequence it with an Atari computer, which was the Atari 520. I’ve actually got an Atari sitting in front of me now that I still use, which is the Atari 1040 (laughs). But yeah, that would have been about 1994 / 1995 that I was working with the S950.”

Was that a revolutionary experience for you to go from using a basic computer set-up to then working on the same equipment that some of the Hip-Hop records you were buying at the time would have been made with?

“Totally. Even though there still wasn’t much sampling time on the S950 back then, it was about ten or twelve seconds, but that was enough. Being able to use that machine back then was a really big stepping stone for me. I was working at the time, digging roads, and I decided that I had to save myself some money and get my own 950. That was around the end of 1995 going into the beginning of 1996. So I saved some money and ended-up buying one off a guy in Crystal Palace that I’d seen advertised in Exchange & Mart.”

Do you remember how much you paid for it?

“I paid £570 for it second-hand which was a lot of money back then. Then, somewhere near Bedford, I brought an Atari ST and started really making beats. I already knew Life as he had a little crew with a studio in Luton and I’d always be messing with them. So I started making beats and giving them to Life. This was around 1996. Life was in and out of prison, I’d be sending him beats, he’d be writing and when we had the opportunity we would make little tapes. Life’s probably still got them somewhere as he’s got hundreds of tapes from back then (laughs).”

So once you’d mastered the S950 there must have been a massive progression in terms of the quality of the beats you were making at that time?

“Yeah, it totally jumped from what I was making messing around on my Amiga to what I was doing at that point. I’d learnt a lot more about breaks by then, partly because I’d also gotten to know Juliano from The Creators through MCM. I mean, Juliano’s on a whole next level with breaks, so when I met him for the first time in the 90s that was another eye-opening experience. It was like, at the time, you think you know everything there is to know about music, but then you realise that you actually don’t know (laughs). So meeting Juliano opened up another different musical world with the library records, the soundtracks, the European records…”

So would you say your beats were getting better at that point because of the familiarity you were gaining with the equipment you were using or because you were being exposed to a wider amount of material to sample?

“It was both, really. I was getting good on the 950, but then going digging with Juliano, taking trips with him up to Birmingham, he’d just be pulling out records and saying to me, ‘Take that, take that, and that one.’ I was just learning from him at that point.”

Were there any memorable digging trips from that period that still stand-out to you?

“Yeah, yeah (laughs). There was one time we were in Birmingham, I can’t remember the exact spot, but this was around the time when people were just discovering David Axelrod. We were in this shop and this place had eight or nine copies of the Electric Prunes album “Release Of An Oath”, with “Holy Are You” on it, and that was just at the time that it had been used on Fat Joe’s second album. I remember we all got a copy of that album and were like, ‘Daammmn!’ There was another guy that MCM knew from High Wycombe, this guy called Gus, this real upper-class posh dude. He didn’t make music but he collected breaks and he had the ill s**t. I think it was actually Gus who Juliano got the break from that he used on The Creators’ “Hard Margin” track with Mos Def and Talib Kweli. Gus was also the first person I knew to have a copy of the “Planete Sauvage” soundtrack. This guy just had crazy records. God knows what happened to him (laughs).”

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Were you spending a lot of money of records back then?

“I was buying records all the time. But it was Juliano who taught me about charity shops. I mean, I wasn’t going into charity shops before then (laughs). At that time, around 1996 / 1997, Juliano was doing a lot of trades with big American producers, going to the record conventions out in New York and doing trades with people like Q-Tip and Pete Rock. I remember, I’d always be carrying around a list of the records that Juliano was looking for. So there might be a John Schroeder version of “Get Out Of My Life, Woman” that he’d be looking for, I’d find it, give it to Juliano, he’d give me some really good stuff, but then he’d trade it with producers out in America because it was a British copy and they couldn’t get it out there. They were going mad for that s**t over there at the time. Whatever deals Juliano did with Q-Tip, he ended-up with all of the instrumental Tribe show albums in his collection. That was all through dealing British breaks with Q-Tip. But I got some of my favourite records off of Juliano, like my Tom Scott “Honey Suckle Breeze” album. I’ve definitely got some good records off him. I actually haven’t seen him for a few years, but Juliano was a real record collector.”

I remember going to Juliano’s house back in 1998 so that him and Si Spex could play me their album “The Weight” for a feature I was writing on them for Fatboss magazine. The interview never actually got printed as the album didn’t come out until two years later. But I can still remember how passionate Juliano was about the music he was playing me and that crazy neck-snap he’d do…

“You probably heard a lot of the same tracks that I did at that point that didn’t actually make the album. There was a Craig G track and also an F.T. track that never made the final release. But, that was the legendary Juliano neck-snap you’re talking about  (laughs). There was no head-nodding, it was his neck just snapping. That and his foot tapping (laughs). But that was around the time that Phi-Life Cypher were talking with Juliano about putting our stuff out. We’d made some demos, like “Drop Bombs”, which we’d recorded in Luton. We gave those to Juliano and he was looking to do his own label and put us out. But then with everything that went on with the Creators album, we sort of got lost in the mix. So Juliano passed our stuff to DJ Vadim and that was how we got the Jazz Fudge link.”

I can still remember picking-up Phi-Life’s “Baddest Man” EP on white label from London’s Deal Real Records back in 1998. Something that struck me immediately about your production on there was that it had a really clear, full-bodied sound to it. Was that something you set out to achieve once you started working in a proper studio?

“I wasn’t even thinking about that sort of stuff when we  were doing the “Baddest Man” EP to be honest with you. I mean, I found it really hard at the time because I’d never been in a proper studio before at that point and the studio we were using had never worked with Hip-Hop artists before. So I was just trying to make everything sound really loud (laughs). When we started doing “Millennium Metaphors”, Juliano mixed some of the album and was really good in the studio, but he liked to really compress everything at the time, so his snares and everything would be really hard. But we were also working with No Sleep Nigel and that man is just a beast in the studio.”

No Sleep Nigel is a legend within UK Hip-Hop circles thanks to his engineer work with Blade, MC Mell’O’, Hardnoise etc. Did you learn anything from working with Nigel in the studio?

“I mean, Nigel just kinda did his thing. A lot of the time, you’d put a track up for him, he’d stick his headphones on and you wouldn’t hear from him for hours (laughs). The one thing with Nigel was that if you started talking to him you’d never get any work done (laughs). He could definitely talk. I mean, he was a lot older than us, he was a big man and he’d have a story for everything. Once you got him started you couldn’t stop him (laughs). So you kinda learnt to just leave him, let him do his thing and you knew it would sound good at the end.”

What producers were you looking up to at that point?

“Prince Paul was always my number one. Then a little later when I was around Juliano, Si Spex and Mark B, I kinda looked up to what they were doing at the time. Then, of course, you had people like DJ Premier, Pete Rock, The Alchemist, Hi-Tek. All those guys at that time were making real good music that was inspiring me.”

You remixed the Mark B & Blade track “Ya Don’t See The Signs” in 2001 which was on the flip of the Grant Nicholas rock version with that single eventually breaking into the UK Top 30. How was that experience for you?

“Yeah. That was definitely a big thing for me. Mark B liked what I was doing and it was really a big step-up for me to do that remix. I remember I really wanted to do it, but I didn’t want to do it at the same time because I was feeling the pressure to deliver. But I wanted to try and make my version a totally different track to the original and, in the end, it came out nice.”

Unlike many producers, you’ve really limited the number of artists you’ve worked with over the years and a lot of your production has remained in-house on the Phi-Life Cypher projects and then Life’s solo material…

“There’s no real reason for it, it’s kinda just happened like that. I mean, I’ve done bits here and there. Even before Phi-Life came out, I produced something for a crew that MCM had back in the 90s called Next Wavelength for a single they put out on Blue Planet Records. I did some remixes for DJ Vadim and worked with a crew from Scotland called Belles In Monica. Then I also did the projects with Inja and I have the “Rebelbase” album with Cappo coming out. But to be honest with you, nobody really asks me for beats. So back then, everything that I was making was going into the Phi-Life material. ”

How would you say your approach to production has changed, if at all, over the years?

“I don’t think it’s changed too much. I mean, when I listen back to beats I did years back I hear them and might think they’re not something that I’d do now. But I don’t know if my approach to making music has really changed. It’s hard to explain. I just make beats (laughs). I mean, there’s a few bits on the new Cappo album that are literally just loops and I think that’s something that I’ve learnt, which is to just go with what sounds good. Before, I would have thought that I couldn’t just loop something, I’d have to put drums on it and everything. Whereas now, if it sounds good then I’ll just leave it. I mean, if you listen to some of the music being made by people like Roc Marciano, he’s just looping s**t, rapping on it and it’s amazing. I feel that Hip-Hop is coming back around to that raw beats and rhymes sound. Just straight, hardcore beats and rhymes. I mean, a few beats on the new “Late Night” project, I haven’t actually sampled anything. I just recorded the music and then pasted the track together like I was cutting tape.”

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What was the idea behind your new instrumental project “Late Night Beat Tape”?

“I’ve been sitting on a lot of those beats for ages. I know that’s something that you probably hear a lot of producers say. But sometimes you make beats for yourself, like, ‘If I could rap then this what I would want to rap over.’ So, a lot of the beats on the “Late Night” project are the type of beats that, if I could rap, I’d be rapping on them. I called it “Late Night” because I’m an insomniac and I’ll be there sampling s**t at whatever time in the morning just making beats. I mean, sometimes you’ll make a beat with a particular emcee in mind or you make something more straight forward with the intention of having someone rap on it. But then, as a producer, you also sometimes make those awkward beats that emcees will say they can’t rap over (laughs). So “Late Night” is just a collection of little bits like that, really.”

You definitely cover a lot of musical ground on the project, including soul, funk, reggae, jazz…

“Yeah, there’s a whole heap of stuff on there. At the minute, I’m kind of into electronic music, Tangerine Dream and stuff like that. I’m finding all of these really weird electronic loops. So there’s a few Tangerine Dream samples on the new project. There’s just a selection of styles on there. I didn’t really over-think it when I was putting it together. I think that if you love Hip-Hop then you’re going to love it. Maybe some people out there don’t like listening to instrumentals and want to hear an emcee on everything, but I think most heads will listen to this and think that it’s dope.”

Does it put you under more pressure when you’re working on an instrumental track knowing that there isn’t going to be an emcee on it to hold the listener’s attention?

“Yeah, it does. You have to make the track more involved and keep the movement going. If there’s not an emcee there that people are listening to as the main focus of a track then it’s very important to be able to keep the listener’s attention. I mean, sometimes you hear instrumental Hip-Hop albums and they’re boring because they’re just straight beats. So, as a producer, if you’re making instrumental stuff, I think it’s really important to make sure it moves and keeps flowing. I want people to listen to what I’m doing and enjoy it, not be thinking of what’s missing from a track whilst they’re listening to it.”

Do you still go out digging for vinyl regularly?

“I was actually out digging earlier today (laughs). I was out with Justice, the guy who’s putting the “Late Night” project out on his Modern Urban Jazz label. He’s from Luton as well and we’ve known each other on and off over the years. He was a big drum & bass man and put out releases of his own. He’s got his own drum & bass label but has always been into Hip-Hop, like a lot of the old-school jungle / drum & bass guys. It was actually him who started pushing me last year to put the “Late Night” project out there. I was just sitting on it and it was something that I would listen to, but I didn’t really know if anyone else would like it. But yeah, we were out earlier today digging. There’s only really one vinyl record shop still here in Luton, Vinyl Revelations, and the guy who runs it has got an outhouse, shed-type thing at his home which is just full of 45s. They’re not in any order or anything, you just have to dig through and see what you can find. But whenever I get a chance, I’m out digging.”

Do you have any other particular spots?

“Not really. I mainly go digging in charity shops, car-boot sales, places like that. There’s a guy who goes to Hitchin market every week with a load of records and everything he sells only costs a pound. I always get bits off him. So I’m still out looking for stuff. I don’t really get that whole online digging thing though, man. To me, it’s about going out, looking at the records, reading the liner notes, trying to find something that has that next big break on it. That’s the part of it that I enjoy most and sometimes you never know what you’ve got until you get home and play it.”

What’s the most you’ve ever paid for a record?

“To be honest, I’ve never had that one record that I’ve paid ridiculous money for. I love records, but I don’t like the fact that people put these mad prices on them.”

What equipment are you using nowadays?

“I got an MPC Renaissance when that came out, so I’m using that at the minute. But I’m having a headache with at the moment because it’s computer-based and my computer is a bit older and they don’t really like each other so there’s a lot of crashing and stuff (laughs). But the Renaissance is really good. It’s definitely a nice bit of kit. I just need a better computer (laughs).”

What happened to the S950 that you started on all those years ago?

“I actually got rid of that last year. I sold it to one of Mr. Thing’s friends, Mo Fingaz, so it went to a good home.”

Was it difficult for you to part with considering the personal history that was attached to it?

“Yeah, it was quite sad to get rid of it, but at the time I needed the money. I mean, all the Phi-Life albums had been done on that and a lot of other stuff. There were a lot of memories attached to that 950 so it was quite a big deal to let it go. But like I said, it went to a good home so I know that it’s going to be looked after.”

When you look at the newer generation of talented UK emcees, is there anyone out there that you’d particularly like to work with?

“I think M9 has been putting out some really good music. I think Fliptrix from the High Focus camp is amazing. Also, Farma G’s son Remus, he’s definitely dangerous. I think there’s definitely a newer generation of emcees and producers coming through now who know what real Hip-Hop is all about. They’ve watched and learnt from the people who came before them and aren’t just jumping on a bandwagon. So there’s definitely some younger dudes out there who are really making some good music, which is something that can only be good for the scene overall. But aside from the newer emcees, I’d still like to do a whole project with Micall Parknsun and also something with MCM as well because he can definitely still rap.”

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What albums, both inside and outside of Hip-Hop, do you listen to and think, ‘I wish I produced that project’?

“Outside of Hip-Hop, the first thing that popped in my head when you said that was Portishead. They were just on some next s**t when they came out. In terms of Hip-Hop, there are just too many albums I could think of that I love, man. My favourite Gang Starr album is “Daily Operation”. That’s the ultimate Gang Starr album for me. I’d also have to say Ultramagnetic MC’s’ “Critical Beatdown” and Diamond D’s “Stunts, Blunts & Hip-Hop”. Those albums just don’t age and are definitely some of the albums that have influenced me over the years, but I could keep naming others for hours (laughs).”

What’s next for you musically?

“Well, Life has an album out called “Sound Of The Underground” that has beats on there from Leaf Dog, Mr. Thing, DJ Lok and myself. But after that, there’s another Life album coming later in the year which is produced entirely by me. The “Rebelbase” album I’ve done with Cappo is all done now and just needs to be mixed and everything. Plus, I still have a lot of Phi-Life Cypher tracks that were recorded before we broke up that will see the light of day at some point. There are still Phi-Life fans out there and I think people would still like to hear that music. I mean, we’d basically recorded a whole album before the split and I don’t think it’s fair that the Phi-Life fans out there can’t hear that for whatever reason. But I just make beats and that’s really all I know. So whether they’re being released out there or not, I’m still going to me making more beats tomorrow.”

So going back to your favourite Gang Starr album, making beats for you really is a daily operation…

“Yeah, exactly. Whether anyone’s listening or not, I’m still going to be making beats. It’s something that’s ingrained in me now and I just still have that real love of music.”

Ryan Proctor

Follow DJ Nappa on Twitter – @Nappa72

 

New Joint – Life MC

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Life MC – “Are You Listening” (@LifeMC / 2013)

DJ Nappa-produced track not included on the UK emcee’s current album “Gift Of Life”.

New Joint – Life MC / Genesis Elijah

Life MC ft. Genesis Elijah – “Power Of The Mind” (LifeMC.BandCamp.Com / 2013)

The veteran UK emcee reps for his Luton stomping grounds in this video from his new DJ Nappa-produced album “Gift Of Life”.

Old To The New Q&A – Life MC

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Since debuting in the late-90s alongside DJ Nappa and Si Phili as part of Luton-based UK Hip-Hop crew Phi-Life Cypher, the talented lyricist known as Life MC has left a huge mark on the homegrown scene thanks not only to his work with the group, but also his quality solo projects and formidable live freestyle skills.

Having helped to influence a new generation of UK emcees with his thought-provoking rhymes and love of the culture, Life now stands as a veteran of the UK rap game, still active, still passionate, and, perhaps most importantly, still considered to be a relevant and important artist within the British Hip-Hop community.

Returning with his fifth solo album “Gift Of Life” (also Life’s first project since the unexpected announcement last year of the Phi-Life Cypher split), the dynamic emcee sounds as inspired as ever, dropping his trademark mix of quickfire punchlines and social commentary over hard-hitting Nappa production whilst also collaborating with the likes of Reveal, Genesis Elijah and Micall Parknsun.

Here, Life discusses his new album, the end of Phi-Life and divisions within UK Hip-Hop.

Keeping in the tradition of your previous solo albums, what’s the concept behind the title of your latest project “Gift Of Life”?

“I feel like I haven’t properly put myself into an album for a good while now what with Phi-Life Cypher splitting up. When we were first doing stuff as Phi-Life we’d try to do twenty tracks on an album for the fans and then you’d get reviews with people saying it was too much music (laughs). So with this new album, I just wanted to give a gift back to the fans in terms of how much music is on the album and I also wanted to be seen to be trying to put some life back into Hip-Hop, which is what I’m really trying to do now with all the different projects I’m currently working on. I just want to really put something back into Hip-Hop because the music has given me so much over the years and has really taken me on a good little journey. So that’s what the basic concept behind the “Gift Of Life” title is.”

I remember picking up a white label copy of Phi-Life Cypher’s “Baddest Man” EP from Deal Real Records in London when it dropped back in 1998. How difficult was it for you as a group coming from Luton to break into that London scene?

“It was probably a bit more difficult for us in terms of communicating and knowing certain people, but all in all, I don’t think it was that difficult for us really. We just made some good music and it got accepted. That was the one thing that I liked, that all the people that I was listening to from London at that time seemed to be feeling our stuff. So I don’t think it was actually that difficult for us at the time to get noticed. It probably did do you a favour as an artist at that time to live in Central London or something, but all in all I don’t think it was really that much of a problem for us to get on the scene. Anything that we did seemed to make an inroad straight away. Obviously the work we did back then with the Gorillaz helped as well because that actually happened before we released our first album in 2000, “Millennium Metaphors”. That definitely helped get our name out there. So yeah, I think it was all good, still.”

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You’ve always been known for your freestyle skills – when did you first become aware that was a talent you possessed?

“I came up through the whole Hip-Hop thing from day one when it was all about the electro and everything back in the 80s. I was a body-popper and I was in this crew and we used to battle every week. We’d go to this local club and it felt like a scene out of “Beat Street” (laughs). I just loved Hip-Hop from the first time I ever heard someone rap. I mean, I used to do reggae deejay-ing and still do. But from listening to Hip-Hop and hearing people rhyming, that’s when I started doing the freestyle thing. Back then, we were living on benefits and didn’t have much money, so at school, I’d do anything to try and get money and it soon became obvious to me that I could freestyle and people liked it. So it got to a point where people would pay me to sit in the school library and they’d bring me books to make up rhymes about. If I could rap for a certain length of time then they’d give me ten or fifteen pence (laughs). I was in a crew with DJ Nappa called Posse In Effect and we won this South East Rap Championships competition or something and all those things were just giving me the inspiration to want to become an artist and really do the music thing properly. What really woke me up in life was going to prison and then really sitting there and reflecting on what I wanted to do. I was sitting there thinking about how I’d talk about people like Malcolm X but didn’t really know what these people had done. So I re-educated myself while I was inside, obviously I had plenty of time to write lyrics and Nappa used to send me TDK tapes with beats on them that I’d put lyrics to. So when I first came out and started spitting stuff, Nappa was like, ‘Yo! This is hot! Do you realise what you’re doing here?’ Nappa called MCM from Caveman, I spat for him and he got me straight onto Kiss FM with them for Max & Dave’s show and I remember a couple of the rappers who went up there with them didn’t want to spit on air after they heard me (laughs). That was 1996.”

Would you say there was a Hip-Hop scene to speak of in Luton at that time?

“It was really difficult rap-wise in Luton because everyone was a dancer or a deejay. There wasn’t really that many people rapping. That was always the thing when we first started, that we had to look to London really when it came to Hip-Hop. There were a couple of young groups trying to do their thing around that time who would come around and cypher but all in all there wasn’t really nobody else in Luton except for ourselves. At the time and even now really, Luton has always been more of a reggae town with the sound systems and all of that. There was always a reggae sound-system culture in Luton so when we first started rapping people would look at you like you were a bit of an idiot (laughs).”

Your solo projects always feel like they’re of the moment rather than being a collection of tracks that have been recorded over time and then pulled together for the sake of putting an album out. Is that the case?

“Anytime I rhyme, even if it’s battle rapping, there will always be something in there dealing with reality because that’s what I’m about. Each of my albums are basically about how I feel in life at that particular time. I don’t really just do tracks here and there and then try to make an album out of them. I’ve always got a thought in mind about what I want to achieve with each album that I put out. But any album I put out will always touch on different aspects of life in some way because that’s what I’m about, talking about reality.”

As an elder statesman of the rap game now, do you feel even more of a responsibility to include some substance in your music than perhaps you even did when you first came out?

“I definitely do and I think that’s something that’s very important for me to do. Also, I’ve spoken to a lot of the UK artists of today or those who’re coming up now who tell me that they grew-up listening to my music and my style of lyricism was an inspiration to them and I can hear that in the way some of those artists rhyme. So, as a forty-four year-old emcee, I definitely feel a responsibility to the UK scene and to the younger artists to really contribute something worthwhile and that’s something that I’ve always been conscious of really. I think more emcees out there should sometimes realise that they do have a responsibility on the microphone and that what they do can have a big impact on the scene as a whole, so it’s not always just about you as an individual. At the end of the day, I want to be responsible in my music and I understand that even if people don’t understand all of the messages in my music, they do get most of them and it’s nice when people look to you as an influence. I enjoy that and I definitely don’t feel it’s a burden. I mean, I had people who influenced me, like seeing Rodney P, Sipho and Bionic when they were doing the London Posse stuff, and also the first time I heard Caveman when they came out in the early-90s. I remember reading Hip-Hop Connection and realising that Caveman were from High Wycombe and thinking, ‘Wow! They’re from a town that’s not too far away from where I am in Luton!’ Because back then, unless you came from New York or London, you sometimes felt like you couldn’t really do this Hip-Hop thing (laughs). So seeing MCM was from High Wycombe and knowing how much I liked his stuff, I was like, ‘If he can do it, then I can do it.’ So all of that stuff was an inspiration to me and I’m happy that I can inspire people in that same way today and that, fifteen years after I first came out, I can still be considered relevant and that people still feel my music and skills.”

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What’s the creative process like between you and Nappa when you’re working on one of your solo projects?

“When I decide to do an album, I usually have a period of about six months where Nappa will just continuously bring me beats and I’ll just keep going through them to find the ones I want to use. What I’ve found is that a lot of Nappa’s beats actually help inspire my lyrics because of the vibe of a particular track. Nappa’s music just brings those lyrics out of my head and I’ll sometimes get an idea or freestyle the first few bars of what then become full verses just because of the way that one of his tracks may feel. I don’t even really have to think too hard about it. It just happens. I’ve always been doing some work lately with other producers like Leaf Dog and also Bad Habits from Split Prophets whose music also has that same impact as well. Their beats do that same thing to me and just bring the lyrics out.”

There was a lot of talk some years back about there being a large generation gap developing within UK Hip-Hop between older heads and the younger generation of artists who were coming up at the time. Do you think that’s still an issue or do you feel that gap has been bridged now in some ways?

“There’ll always be a gap between the different generations of Hip-Hop heads to some extent because everyone has their own vibe and opinion of what they see the music as being. I mean, to me, I do feel there was a bit more of a scene when we were coming up, then when the grime scene came up that contributed to that generation gap to some extent as well because there were a lot of young rappers making music that some of the older heads didn’t feel had anything to do with Hip-Hop. But, really, there will always be a gap between different parts of the overall scene. I mean, the one I’m seeing happening now is between the battle rap scene and everything else that’s going on. I really don’t like it and I’ve been seeing a lot of things on Twitter between different people who’re involved in that part of the scene and I’ve been trying to call people up as an elder and tell them that I’m not trying to get involved in people’s business but that I think that all of us who’re part of the UK Hip-Hop scene have to keep in mind that the next generation who’re coming up might be kept apart because of divisions that people are contributing to today. It doesn’t benefit anyone when fans of certain events or artists don’t mix with the fans of other events or artists because of divisions that are being put in place between them. That does nothing for the UK scene as a whole and everyone always claims that they’re all about doing stuff to benefit the scene so it’s time everyone realised that for that scene to flourish and for us to build something for the future, sometimes we have to understand that it’s not all about our own individual agendas. That’s what the scene is really missing now is a little bit more unity and togetherness. But I think in today’s generation, everyone just wants to be a superstar and it’s not even necessarily about the message in your music, what you’re doing to contribute to the scene or anything else. It’s just all about you. But personally, I don’t think that’s healthy for the UK scene overall.”

I know some people feel that part of the problem with some of those within the battle rap scene here in the UK is that they’re not approaching it as being a part of wider Hip-Hop culture. It’s just a competitive sport almost. They might rap, but they’re not necessarily of the culture…

“It really doesn’t make sense to me because, battle rap or not, it’s still Hip-Hop. But what you’re getting is people becoming involved in the battle rap genre here in the UK who know nothing about the music it’s come from. They know nothing about the history of Hip-Hop, they don’t understand the culture or know about some of the music’s most influential artists. They just know about what’s happening within this battle rap scene, which I don’t think is good because that then means you’ve lost track of the culture when you need to know as much about it as possible to be able to help move it forward.”

With that in mind, you recently performed at this year’s Boom Bap Festival. Although it’s only in its second year, how important do you think an annual event like Boom Bap is to UK Hip-Hop?

“It’s very, very, very important, man. Even though it’s only once a year, it’s a time when you know that everyone has the opportunity to come together and celebrate our scene. It’s a great opportunity for networking, it’s a great opportunity for the fans to see so many of the artists they like performing in one place, and it’s also giving people a real sense of the culture of Hip-Hop that shows people that it’s about more than just the rapping element. So I really rate what everyone involved in the Boom Bap Festival is doing and I definitely think it’s good for Hip-Hop. I really felt that myself when I was there. Personally for me, it was great to see different people who I might not have seen for awhile. Like, it was great to see someone like Chester P, give him a hug and have a quick chat. So Boom Bap is definitely helping to bring back that sense of togetherness and unity to the scene.”

life mc pic 4

You announced late in 2012 that Phi-Life Cypher had split and earlier this year you and Nappa released a lengthy video blog which gave some further insight into the reasons behind the situation. How difficult was it for you to walk away from a group you’d been part of for so many years?

“Like I said in the video blog, it wasn’t really a case of me walking away from the group, that was Phili’s decision. So after that, there was really no choice but to just carry on and get on with what we’re doing now as myself and Nappa. But again, like I said in the video, in the background of Phi-Life Cypher it was a difficult situation. Unfortunately, it wasn’t always what it seemed to be to the fans. It was hard work. I mean, it had got to the stage really where it was like when you’re watching a movie, you’re thinking, ‘This is pretty boring, I don’t think I like it, but I’ll give it another ten minutes to see if it improves.’ But then it gets to the point where you’re so far into the movie that you may as well just watch that last hour and see it through. So that’s kinda what it was like with the situation within the group. But what I’ve found since not being in Phi-Life is that there’s now a massive difference in my productivity in terms of how much stuff we were doing as a group then and how much more stuff I’m actually working on now. I mean, I’ll never feel comfortable with the fact that the group ended and, as far as Phili is concerned, for me to know that we travelled the world together for fifteen years, we did all these things together, we spent so much time sat down together writing rhymes, I’ll never feel comfortable with the way it ended and the bad feelings that now exist. The whole situation has really affected me quite a bit, even with regards to it making it more difficult for me to do what I’m trying to do now with the music. Certain people started unfollowing me on Twitter, people who were working with me stopped working with me and wouldn’t even reply to my messages, things like that. But, at the end of the day, it’s a part of life and you just have to move on. I mean, you can be vexed and annoyed for a certain amount of time, but as a grown man I don’t harbor bad feelings or hate and nothing good can really come out of negativity unless you turn it into a positive. So that’s what I’m really trying to do now with the end of Phi-Life Cypher, is just turn that negative situation into something positive through the music I’m making and what I’m now able to do in terms of working with some of today’s younger artists and being able to collaborate with more people in the scene.”

You’ve mentioned on Twitter recently that you have a number of new projects in the pipeline – what can people expect next?

“The next project I have coming is with Bad Habits on production which really just started with me listening to Split Prophets, thinking they were dope, talking about maybe doing a track, then that turned into possibly doing an EP, and Habits just kept sending me beats and they were all just so dope. Initially, I started writing to about five different beats in about two days and I was having to tell myself to chill and just finish one (laughs). So when I got to about four or five tracks, I was like, ‘Yo! We can do an EP!’ But he just kept sending me beats, I kept writing and the next minute there was basically an album there that came out of nowhere that sounded really dope. So that will be coming out on Split Profits’ label. I’m pretty excited about that album. I’ve also done an EP with a guy called K The Original. Then my next album with Nappa is already recorded, I have about twenty-four tracks done for that. But then before that, there’s another EP coming out which has production from Leaf Dog, Mr. Thing, DJ LoK, Nappa and B109. I’ve also got a little group which I’ve started called Team Classic which is me, Nappa and a singer, which is still Hip-Hop but it has a soul, jazz feel to it as well which is really nice, positive music. It’s another way of making the quality music we want make whilst trying something different without trying to make something that has that typical radio sound to it.”

And after what’s just happened to Choice FM here in the UK, the traditional outlets for quality Hip-Hop are becoming less and less…

“Yeah, a hundred percent. It’s horrible to see that happening, but you just have to keep fighting the cause and hope somebody hears, man.”

So given that homegrown Hip-Hop artists making credible music still face so many obstacles today in terms of being heard, what keeps you motivated after all these years?

“Honestly, and I know this might sound corny or whatever, but it really comes down to my love and passion for the music. Growing-up and maturing, I’ve found that I just want to be more creative and for there to be progression in what I’m doing now. I want to be able to sit down in another ten years and know that I really made a difference with my music, whether that be to the UK scene overall or by influencing certain artists, whatever it may be. Plus, at this stage of life that I’m at, I’m in a difficult situation because for the last few years I’ve had a really bad spinal problem which has given me a lot of pain and mobility issues, which has meant I’ve been having to spend a lot more time at home. But being home a lot has reminded me of the time all those years ago when I was in prison and I realised that it’s still possible for me to do something, make a difference and contribute to the UK scene, which is all I want to do. I still want to see the UK scene continue to grow because it helped me and allowed me to travel the world with my music and make a difference in people’s lives. I’ve taken so much from the scene over the years and now I really want to be able to give something back. That’s my inspiration right now, man.”

Ryan Proctor

Follow Life MC on Twitter – @LifeMC. 

Life MC ft. Reveal – “Beat Smashers” (LifeMC.BandCamp.Com / 2013)

New Joint – Life MC / Reveal

Life MC ft. Reveal – “Beat Smashers” (@LifeMC / 2013)

Produced by DJ Nappa.

Live Lyrics – Life MC

UK veteran Life MC delivers a potent freestyle over a DJ Nappa-produced beat.

New Joint – Life MC

Life MC – “Survival Mode MC” (@LifeMC / 2013)

Live performance of a Sensa-produced track from the veteran UK emcee’s forthcoming fifth solo album.

New Joint – Phi-Life Cypher

Phi-Life Cypher – “It Could All End 2Morrow” (@PhiLife_Cypher / 2012)

Life MC and Si Phili drop an in-house live performance of this new track from the crew’s forthcoming album.

Cypher Jam – Phi-Life Cypher

Footage of Phi-Life Cypher performing “2, 3 Break” at a recent Speakers Corner event in London.

Gospel Reprise EP Sampler – MCM

Following on from last year’s epic project “The Gospel” former Caveman frontman MCM unleashes more music from the vaults with his new EP “Gospel Reprise” featuring fellow UK heavywights Ty and DJ Nappa.

New Joint – Phi-Life Cypher

Phi-Life Cypher – “Watchin’ My TV” (PhiLifeCypher.Com / 2011)

Produced by Richy Spitz.

Album Review – MCM

MCM

“The Gospel (1994 – 2011) – The Missing Gems Of MCM”

(I-Innovate)

In the same way that New York and Los Angeles have, until recent years at least, always been viewed as the two major cities on the US Hip-Hop map, London has long been considered the epicentre of the UK rap scene. In the 80s acts such as London Posse, Demon Boyz, Hijack and MC Duke not only stood as sonic representatives of the UK’s capital city, but also defined the entire British rap scene of the time, with very few artists from outside of the London area being viewed as credible, regardless of their talent. All that would change, however, when a trio from High Wycombe recording under the name Caveman dropped their classic 1990 debut single “Victory” through the UK arm of Profile Records.

Not only did the crew of MCM, DJ Diamond J and producer The Principle open people’s ears to the fact that there was Hip-Hop of note being made outside of London’s urban environment, they also brought with them a shift in musical direction from what was considered to be the traditional British rap sound. Prior to Caveman, UK rap was largely known for what became tagged as the ‘Britcore’ style – hard, dense production, fast-paced lyrics and militant imagery (think Hijack, Gunshot, Killa Instinct). But when the Buckinghamshire-based crew dropped, they brought with them a jazzy, funky edge that had more in common with popular Stateside groups of the time such as Gang Starr and A Tribe Called Quest than it did with the most of the music being made by the group’s peers just some thirty miles away in the Big Smoke.

Early Caveman singles such as the aforementioned “Victory” and the brilliant “Fry You Like Fish” caught some unfair criticism from staunch UK rap supporters who felt the crew were simply trying to emulate the sounds emanating from New York, but by the time the group’s debut album “Positive Reaction” dropped in 1991 it was clear Caveman’s musical identity was very much their own. The album was packed with tight, sample-heavy production, deft cuts and witty, often personal lyrics that came with a conscious, uplifting element. The crew even caught a little mainstream attention for their lively Jimi Hendrix-sampling single “I’m Ready”.

Although Caveman’s sophomore album (1992’s “The Whole Nine Yards…”) wouldn’t receive the critical acclaim of its predecessor, with the group splitting soon after, the impact “Positive Reaction” had on the homegrown rap scene was clearly tangible and is perhaps even more evident in hindsight than it was at the time. Although MCM would go on to release some stellar solo singles throughout the mid-to-late-90s, one of the UK’s best-loved rappers largely dropped off the radar, another name seemingly destined to be confined to the annals of UK rap history. Until now.

Taking its title from the shelved mid-90s album MCM was due to release via a deal with BMG, “The Gospel” is a mammoth 32-track collection of full-length joints and instrumental interludes spanning the last seventeen years. The trick here is that the album hasn’t been sequenced in chronological order, so although it’s possible to spot a few of the older tracks due to MCM’s youthful delivery, for the most part it’s easy to forget you’re listening to a body of work work covering almost two decades. The remastering quality of the older cuts contained here is on point, bringing them inline with more recent work in terms of their overall sound, so until the High Wycombe wordsmith shouts out a “2003” here or a “1998” the album plays as one cohesive project.

MCM’s love of soulful breaks and samples ties “The Gospel” together, and it’s this passion for all things funky that informs all the tracks included here, both old and new. Largely self-produced but also featuring musical input from a handful of like-minded collaborators, “The Gospel” basks in the warm sonic glow of golden-age boom-bap and jazzy vibes. Building on the musical blueprint set out on Caveman’s “Positive Reaction”, “The Gospel” showcases an artist whose creative direction has never been influenced by the trends of the time, with MCM’s love of true-school Hip-Hop evident throughout.

The beginning of the project finds MCM going back to the future, with a re-vocalled Rinse Dog-produced remix of the previously mentioned Caveman track “Fry You Like Fish”. Rattling drums and huge bass kicks are almost enough to set-off involuntary demonstrations of The Running-Man, whilst MCM delivers his witty rhymes of twenty years ago in an obviously more mature tone.  The self-explanatory “Jay Dee Tribute” finds M dropping conscious rhymes over a Dilla-inspired track which also features a dope verse from newcomer Magical.

On the DJ Nappa-produced “Came Into My Life” MCM uses the well worn metaphor of Hip-Hop as being a woman with whom he’s shared a rocky yet passionate relationship with over the years. But rather than sounding tired and overused, the sincerity in M’s rhymes brings new life to the oft-heard comparison (“A lotta new jacks and industry cats, wanna get up in your thighs, try you out for size….90% of your rappers on some fake G shit, don’t know how to caress the steel when it’s time to spit”).

The hypnotic Maverick-produced “Blow Your Mind” is easily one of the album’s high points, as MCM faces the stresses of life over a beautifully crafted backdrops of soulful vocal samples and gentle pianos. Meanwhile, Demon Boyz member DJ Devastate increases the album’s head-nod quotient in no uncertain terms with 1995’s “You Can’t Fade Me”, a potent blend of jazzy Buckwild-esque boom-bap and forceful social commentary.

“The Strength” is a hauntingly mellow track which finds MCM explaining the importance belief in a higher spiritual power holds in his day-to-day life, whilst the previously-released self-produced banger “Power Moves” stills sounds as humongous today as it did back in the mid-90s, thanks to its obese beats and timeless samples. “On The Spot” is a dope, stripped-down pass-the-mic cipher jam featuring TKO and Da Verse dropping some punchline-heavy bars alongside their brother-in-rhymes.

Considering the length of “The Gospel” the quality levels remain high throughout, with even the Pete Rock-style instrumental interludes being worthy of your time. This project isn’t merely an excuse to release a heap of archived tracks for the sake of nostalgia that wasn’t considered good enough to be heard the first time around, instead it’s the sound of an artist finally being given the opportunity to share good music that circumstance and finances prevented from being released when most of it was initially recorded.

There are some who will consider “The Gospel” to be a comeback of sorts for MCM, but in essence, the likeable emcee from Bucks never left, as evidenced by the wealth of quality unreleased material included here.

So the question now isn’t about what MCM has been doing for all these years since Caveman split, it’s what is he going to come with in the future now he’s planted himself firmly back on the UK rap map?

On the strength of “The Gospel”, whatever MCM does next, it’s going to be something worth waiting for.

Ryan Proctor

“The Gospel” will be released in June 2011.

New Joint – Phi-Life Cypher

Phi-Life Cypher – “2, 3 Break” (PhiLifeCypher.Com / 2011)

Featuring b-boy crew The Hustle Kidz and taken from the Luton group’s forthcoming album “The Professionals”.